The Art of Selling Online Courses

Overcoming Customer Objections to Boost Sales and Conversions - with Monica Badiu

September 27, 2023 John Ainsworth Season 1 Episode 105
The Art of Selling Online Courses
Overcoming Customer Objections to Boost Sales and Conversions - with Monica Badiu
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Tired of losing potential customers due to objections you can't quite crack? We've got Monica, our in-house copywriting expert and copy coach, who will equip you with strategies to not only comprehend these objections, but also to convince your potential customers to trust your product.

In the first half of the episode, we break down the process of data collection and how to use it to understand your audience better. Monica shares her wealth of knowledge on creating engaging surveys, segmenting your audience, and asking the right questions that help reveal why potential customers might be on the fence. And it's not just about understanding - we also delve into the art of persuasion. From using data to leveraging testimonials and case studies, to citing industry stats and even celebrity endorsements, we cover it all. Not to forget the power of a good old money back guarantee in alleviating fears!

The latter part of the episode is all about capitalizing on your newfound understanding and trust to boost your sales. We discuss how to craft compelling sales pitches, how to respond to objections and how to present your offer in a way that speaks to your audience's needs. Whether you're a seasoned online course creator or just starting out, this episode is bound to fill your knowledge bank with tips and techniques to enhance your sales and make your mark in the online course industry. So, tune in and let's get those conversions soaring!

Speaker 1:

you'll first need to segment. You're gonna send a survey to non-buyers and a survey to buyers. So for buyers, you can ask them. So what were some of the reasons that made you decide to try our course? Did you have any specific concerns before investing in this course? What was the first thing that surprised you when you started to learn with us? Was the course different from what you were expecting it to be before you signed up? And for non-buyers, you can go with a segmentation based on how long they've been on your email list. Because if you're gonna send a survey to someone who's joined your list this week and you're gonna ask them hey, why aren't you buying my course? You're not gonna have really good answers, but you can segment by people who have opened your sales emails for a few weeks, months maybe.

Speaker 2:

Hello and welcome to the art of selling online courses. We're here to share winning strategies and secret hacks from top performers in the online course industry. My name is John Ainsworth and today's guest is Monica. Monica's our in-house copywriting chief and copy coach. She specializes in sales copywriting for online course creators who wanna produce copy that speaks to their ideal customer and generates conversions, and today we're gonna be talking about some of the most common objections that buyers have and what you can do to tackle them effectively. Most people just do not address these things at all, and it means that a lot of people who actually are quite interested in buying don't end up buying, so we wanna talk through what to do about that. Now, before we start learning from Monica and we get to the meat and potatoes of today's episode, I've got an announcement for you. If you enjoy the tips, techniques and the hacks that you hear on this podcast and you wanna get more of them in a straight to the point condensed version, check out our YouTube channel.

Speaker 2:

Every week, we turn the highlights from each episode into YouTube shorts, and the shorts feature the most potent and helpful sound bites from each episode. They're a great way to grab the one big thing from each episode that's gonna improve your business and increase your profits. Plus, of course, we've got the full versions of each episode on the channel, with video me gesticulating wildly and you get to see what I look like when I laugh like an idiot. So we've also gotten there. We're starting to build a library of funnel building how-to videos. So that's gonna be building up over time of like specific details of how you actually implement stuff as well. So check out the YouTube channel. The link to it is in the show notes. Or go to datadrivenmarketingco and scroll to the bottom of the page and you'll see a little YouTube icon. You can click on that. It's an easy way to get there as well. So back to the show, monica, welcome.

Speaker 1:

It's great to be back.

Speaker 2:

So we're gonna talk today about objections. What are some of the most common objections that potential course buyers have that might stop them from buying?

Speaker 1:

So I think it's about four. One is like it's too expensive, it's not for me, I don't have time, I don't have enough information about how this works and obviously you're gonna have like small variations about this which can be specific to each brand or topic or industry. To some extent, lots of course creators already know that these are some objections people have, but they don't really do much about it.

Speaker 2:

Okay. So do you think there is a need for most people to go out and figure out what the objections are from their audience, or do you think they could just list it for memory, because they've already heard these things from emails or whatever before?

Speaker 1:

Ideally, you go and ask your audience, you go and ask non-buyers, you go and ask buyers, you talk to happy clients, you talk to unhappy clients, you send surveys. You go through testimonials, refunds, customer complaints. You can even go and search your course online and see what the reviews are saying, because many course creators they have a feeling about what's not working, but that's just an assumption and marketing doesn't really work on assumptions. It works on actual data. So that's why you actually need to talk to your audience, to get the data from them and see exactly what are their objections. We've had situations where the course creator thought that the reason people are not buying is that they're not tech savvy enough, like they don't know how to actually use the knowledge in a techie situation. But the actual objections were about them not trusting the brand enough to take that chance and implement what that course creator was teaching, even if it was in a technical setting.

Speaker 2:

So when you say to do a survey, what actually would people send out in the survey? What's the kind of questions they're gonna be asking?

Speaker 1:

So you'll first need to segment. You're gonna send a survey to non-buyers and a survey to buyers. So for buyers, you can ask them. So what were some of the reasons that made you decide to try our course? Did you have any specific concerns before investing in this course? What was the first thing that surprised you when you started to learn with us? Was the course different from what you were expecting it to be before you signed up? And for non-buyers, you can go with a segmentation based on how long they've been on your email list. Because if you're gonna send a survey to someone who's joined your list this week and you're gonna ask them hey, why aren't you buying my course?

Speaker 1:

You're not gonna have really good answers, but if you can segment by people who have opened your sales emails for a few weeks months maybe and just ask them. So, hey, monica, we see that you're interested in our course, but you're not really ready to take action and we would love for you to help us understand why and you can ask them. Are you looking at other courses right now? Is it budget? Is it time? Where are you struggling with right now? How can we do a better job of explaining what this course does? You can even have multiple choice questions, which is like which of the following reasons is why you're not joining the course Other people, you're just gonna be like I just don't understand what this course is all about. I don't understand how this course is gonna help me. So that's the kind of feedback you can get from surveys.

Speaker 2:

Cool, okay. So first thing is, lots of people don't understand what the reasons are that their audience isn't buying, or the common objections, but there's four that are almost universal. It sounded like which is it's too expensive, like someone's thinking I could just find some line for free, maybe. Or I can't afford this. Second one it's not for me. This isn't going to help someone in my specific situation, when that might not be true Now, if it's not for them, if it's actually not going to help them, then you want to be able to tell them that.

Speaker 2:

But if it is for them and they think it's not, then that's an issue. Third one I don't have time, or now's not the right time to do it, which you need to figure out. If that's not true, you need to be addressing that. And fourthly, I don't have enough information about how it works. So that's our kind of four main objections, and then the next step is go do a survey of your buyers and of your non buyers, and you've just run through what the questions were there. Look through testimonials why do people buy? Look at refunds why did people not? What are people not like? What are the customer support complaints? If there's any reviews online, collect all that together, probably in one place, go through it and make a list of what the most common objections are, and then that's the things that you need to address. Is that fair? Yeah, sounds good.

Speaker 2:

Great, okay, so what do most people do at the moment to tackle customer objections?

Speaker 1:

Well, you have that frequently asked questions section on every course page, but it's mostly like how do I pay?

Speaker 1:

What do I don't like it? Is there a refund? What are my payment options? How long do I have access? Those questions, let's say they are a really good start, but they're only scratching the surface because you're really not tackling the important questions, not tackling the important things. And when you tackle the fears, the concerns, the conversation they're already having in their mind while they're looking at your course, that's when you actually get their attention and they feel like this course creator, this person is actually someone who knows me, who knows my problem, who has had enough experience with people just like me that he kind of knows what are my questions, my concerns, my worries. So that's a really good start. But a lot of people, a lot of brands, they're just not tackling customer objections in a direct way. I would even say that some do it accidentally. It's not on purpose. It's like there's some kind of fear. Let's not talk about the fears of the customer.

Speaker 2:

So it's almost like if you brought it up, there's a fear that people have that if they brought up the objection that customers have, then it would make people think about that objection when the reality is people are already thinking about that objection and just you're not addressing it, so they never get an answer to it.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and if you don't address it, somebody else will. So if they have a question about how the course works or who is the person that's going to get the best results with this course, and you're not answering that question, they're going to go to Google and they're going to search and maybe they're going to get a review. That isn't all that good, and then they're just going to switch to a competitor because, again, your course is not the only course solving the same problem. So if a competitor does a better job handling customer objections, you're missing out.

Speaker 2:

I remember I was looking at buying a course and it had, and I was thinking to myself, I wonder if you just kind of just get this information for free, like from YouTube videos or whatever. And I looked on the page and it said couldn't? I find like one of the frequently asked questions Can't I get this information for free? And it said, yeah, you probably can, but how much time is it going to take you scrolling through and looking at all those different YouTube videos and you don't know which one of them is good? So it's going to have to spend hours and hours trying to figure out the good ones. And then you'll be following it and those ones aren't as well organized as this. It's going to take you longer to kind of make sense of it all, but you can get it.

Speaker 2:

It's all available for free. It's just going to take you longer to do. If you, how much time have you got? And I was like, oh, I haven't got that much time. I should buy this course. I was just like, oh, that felt really refreshing, like they just actually properly answered the question.

Speaker 1:

That's a really good example of tackling a customer objection on a sales page and you can do the same in an email.

Speaker 2:

Nice, Okay. So first of all, we need to know what the common objections are. We've got a few that are standard. We've got ways of figuring out what the other ones are. Most people at the moment are just not tackling the objections, so instead, what we're suggesting is tackling the objections straight on on the sales page and in emails. Is there anywhere else? How does that work in terms of in the emails? When would you address those?

Speaker 1:

Well, a common strategy is just having like a frequently asked question email and it's so long, like you just keep scrolling and you see question slash, objection and then answer question, objection answer. So that's a really common way of doing it. We usually do it within the last 72 to 48 hours of a promotion and sometimes we skip it. Sometimes we do a more minimalistic version of it. Other times we just focus on three big objections. It kind of depends on, again, the audience, the offer and what are the specific objections the audience has.

Speaker 1:

Other times you can just have like individual emails tackling individual objections. So what are your options? Well, you could try this or you could try that, but what if I'm not taking a V? We answer that specific objection and we explain how that works. What if it's going to take too long? Or what if I don't like it? So all of these can be individual emails that can tackle each specific objection. Again, it kind of depends on the audience, the offer and how many objections there are. But usually most brands do have a decent amount of trust with their audience. So you don't have to have a whole promotion just talking about objections. You can talk about benefits and transformations as well. But there are situations when the level of trust is just so low that you need to have a whole promotion where you just tackle objections and kind of hope for the best.

Speaker 2:

So someone's now. Obviously what we do with our done with you clients or done for you clients is we're helping them to figure out, or what is the right strategy here in terms of are we going to have separate emails about each of these or we're going to have one email with all of them? What I suggest? If you're feeling like there's too many options and you're not sure which one to go with, I suggest you just have that one email. That's all of the frequently asked questions addressed in that one place. And this is a tactic that we learned from Andy Fossett at GMB Gold Medal Bodies, who's like a I don't know they do a few million a year, I think in core sales Very, very good. He's an excellent marketer and we learned this tactic from them and then have used it ourselves and it's worked really well in campaigns that we've run. So you do that one email, maybe 72 hours so there's normally three emails in the last 72 hours before the last two days or three days before the campaign finishes and make one of those emails into this frequently asked questions. You take all the questions and you answer all of them in detail. People won't read the whole email, but they will scroll until they find the question that they've got, and then they'll read that one, so it allows you to address all of the concerns that they might have. Great, okay.

Speaker 2:

Now, when you're answering these objections, how do you get people to actually believe what you're telling them? In terms of the one that I said about time, sorry about, couldn't you find this for free? That kind of didn't need a lot of proof, because he was saying, yeah, you're right, you could get it, and then explaining. And then when you heard it, you go, oh yeah, that sounds, that sounds right. Actually, that sounds about true. So that was quite simple. But other ones where maybe something needs a bit more evidence, how can you convince them that what you're saying is true?

Speaker 1:

Well, obviously you can just say it and hope they're gonna believe you.

Speaker 1:

You use data, so you use social proof, such as testimonials and case studies. You can use industry stats. So let's say there is even a stat in the industry that says there are 10,000 books on figuring out how to use email marketing to sell a course. Reading 10,000 books is gonna take on average I don't know 5,000 hours. Do you have time for that? No, obviously you don't. You can even put things into perspective, saying a recent study discovered that 80% of businesses close their doors within the first year. If you're a first time entrepreneur and you just open your business, can you afford to go out of business within your first year? So you can use that kind of data to back up your claims. But ideally you're gonna use testimonials and case studies, because that actually shows them that what you're doing works and it also helps them identify with the kind of person who's gonna have success with what you're doing.

Speaker 1:

So you can say we can go back to your objection. Well, can't I find all of this online? Well, yeah, you can. And Monica did it as well. She didn't want to try this course and she actually went and spent 100 hours in one month going through everything she could on YouTube and she eventually ended up miserable and in depth because she attempted to implement what she found on YouTube. And while YouTube is an amazing source for education, that doesn't mean that all that content is actually true or real or accurate. So you can go to choose something for free online, but that doesn't mean it's gonna help your business. Our course is created by industry experts. We have tens of thousands of students who were able to achieve this outcome and we have all this data that tests that our strategies are actually working.

Speaker 2:

All right. So in order to convince people that what you're saying is true, you want information from other people besides yourself. So testimonials, case studies, information from industry experts or influencers, or other people's studies that have been done, anything else that we can have that's going to help to tackle objections besides those kind of answers to the questions.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, another good one would be celebrity endorsements or industry experts who say, look, I've tried 10,000 things before I found this. When I did, within the first month I got results that I never thought would be possible. I would 100 percent recommend everyone in this industry who is struggling with this to give this course a try. Then obviously you end with a money back guarantee. That's the ultimate way to tackle objections and ease them in, because obviously they're not going to be able to see exactly what's in the course until they give it a try. The money back guarantee allows them to figure out if the course is for them or not. We could have a whole episode talking about money back guarantee and who should have it and how it works and does it even work, and all of that. But ideally a money back guarantee does help tackling all objections under one roof.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I know I've gone through that. I bought a course a little while ago and I was like I'm not sure if this is right for me, the way he's describing it. Maybe it is, maybe it isn't, I'm not quite sure. I saw some of the modules look like they would be good and so I bought the course. But I saw I had a money back guarantee. So I was like, well, tell you what, I could just buy it and I'll have a look at it and I'll see.

Speaker 2:

And I went through the early modules. I was like, no, I'm already doing this stuff. And I went through the later ones that were about the bits I needed help with and they were too short. They were like here's an intro to this topic rather than here's exactly how to do this. I was like, oh, OK, right, I see, it's not for me, Cool. And I got my money back. I was just like, oh, that was fine, you know, like that allowed me to go and for it. But if it had been right for me, because then I would have had my money and I would have been delighted and it's like, but without that money back guarantee, I never would have made that purchase. Because I was like oh, it's a thousand dollars, that's a lot of money. If I'm not sure if it's going to be right or not, you know well, listeners are going to say well, you didn't actually made that purchase.

Speaker 2:

Well, no, but I would point out for your money bag yeah.

Speaker 2:

I got my money back but I wouldn't, so they didn't get the money from me, right. So but if I'd been somebody who was in the same position, but it was the right course for me, then they made that sale extra. So if you'd give a money back guarantee, obviously you have more refunds but you overall make more sales. But we're not talking today about money back guarantees particularly, you know, specifically are we. But, like, overall you make more sales when you have a money back guarantee because the people on the fence are more likely to buy.

Speaker 1:

Exactly and obviously. Money back guarantees are really good when your copy and your offer really talk to the right audience. Because, people don't really like money back guarantees, thinking, well, they're going to take advantage of this. They will if it's not the right audience.

Speaker 2:

All right. So let's talk through. So we had those really common objections at the beginning. People need to address those ones. So, even if they don't go through and they don't do the surveys and look at the feedback forms and figure out their common objections for real, like the ones for their particular audience, for their particular course. These are the ones that this is kind of like the 80-20, right, if you just answer these, that's still a long way further forward. So let's go through and do a little breakdown of the kind of answers that you could have for people. If they've got to these objections they can put on the sales page and in their emails. So let's start off with the one that it's too expensive.

Speaker 1:

Okay. So if you find that that's a very common answer from your audience, that's likely because the offer it's presented in a way that sounds like it would help everyone. So that makes it very vague and not specific to an audience that says, yes, this is my problem and I need help with this right now. If you say it's going to help everybody, you're not really helping your business. You're also probably not doing a good job explaining the actual benefits, because if someone says, well, this sounds too expensive, of course they're going to say it's too expensive. If you're going to tell them I have 400 hours of content and that's it video lessons I actually see that copy. That says nothing about the benefit.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I'm going for 100 hours.

Speaker 1:

It says nothing about what the buyer can actually do with it. However, if you're going to tell them, well, I have 400 lessons on how you can make money while you sleep. That's something else. This is also a very common issue with courses that don't have testimonials, or they don't have really good testimonials. You know the ones that say well, before I found it, I was struggling with this problem, and then I found this course and within the first month, everything changed for me. I'm so happy and amazed. My life is whatever Another one would be, because the audience is not the right fit, and this is something we see a lot, with traffic coming from Facebook ads. When the cost per click is really low, you're probably getting not really good leads, and when they're faced with the opportunity to buy something, even if it's like $27, they're going to say it's too expensive, right.

Speaker 2:

Right, right, just because I don't have money. Exactly.

Speaker 1:

And then the other thing, and this is very important if you don't have any proof of your expertise like who is this person trying to convince me that I should learn how to make money from them? If you have nothing behind your name, if you don't have awards, testimonials, case studies you're not going to be able to convince people to give you their money because there's no trust, there is no brand recognition, there's nothing. So if you come out of the blue and you ask for $1,000, for something and this is the first time that person is hearing about you you're not going to get them to even try your product because it sounds too expensive. But if you tell them, well, I've been in this business for 10 years and during this time I've made $10 million from passive income, selling, building, running. I know 100 websites and I can teach you how to do the same. I've taught I don't know, 1,000 other people.

Speaker 1:

Here's what you're saying and these tactics. They've been proven to do this and this and this. That's something completely different, because people, they're going to give you their money if they trust, if they have trust with your brand and if they are in the right awareness of the problem they're in, if they're desperate to know they're going to be able to do it. Know desperate enough, they'll buy. That's one way of seeing it as well. But again, that goes back to the right audience.

Speaker 2:

Okay, so this interesting one. Right, because what we're talking about here is probably not done in a Frequently asked questions section. This sounds like it's done throughout the whole sales page, in the sales process, right, it's like you've got testimonials. That's already one part of a sales page that's separate to this. The audience is not a right fit. Well, that's talking about your targeting of your, your ads or you know who you're getting through to your website. You're not doing a good job explaining the benefits. Okay, well, that explaining the benefits is a different section of the sales page. So you kind of actually would should address this by actually having a generally good sale, a good product, good expertise, making sure you actually are an expert and can teach these people I have credibility, explaining that, giving testimony on yours, etc. Do you also have this as a frequently asked question, or is this just addressed through the rest of the marketing copy?

Speaker 1:

You can have a frequently asked question for each of these things with we've just mentioned again it goes back to how bad are the objections and how much trust or lack of you have with your audience. But yes, this is, you're gonna do this throughout your sales page. You're gonna do this constantly with your emails. So it's not just one section, because you could have a really good copy. It doesn't matter if the offer, the benefits of the offer, they're not real. You could have a really good copyright or writing the headlines and everything sounds sexy and amazing. But if you don't know your actual Customer, your audience and how your offer benefits your audience, you're not gonna see that many sales. Because this whole process it's not just copy, it's the whole business strategy. It's building the offer, it's building your business. So it's more than just having you know the FAQ section and thinking, oh, I've done this, this is the end of it.

Speaker 2:

All right, what about the next one? It's not for me, I. Like this one, so much, okay, go on so I've mentioned this before.

Speaker 1:

The reason we have monthly promotions is very simple. If you have 10,000 people on your email list, it's very unlikely that all 10,000 people are gonna be in the same problem solution awareness state and Also ready to buy what you're selling. So this goes back to the subjection Some problem, some problems. They're not gonna be as interesting or as appealing to your audience At the same time. So you really need to be clear about who this course is for and Rule of the people that aren't a good fit.

Speaker 1:

You can even link it specifically to stages of their life. So this course is really good for moms who are having a hard time I'm Dealing with anxiety because their kid they're going off to college Versus. This is really good for moms who are dealing with anxiety over their kid going to kindergarten. This course is not for dads, though, because we only talk about, I know, the relationship between the mom and the kid. Or this course is really good for people who want to learn Korean for business purposes. We tackle formalities that are often found in Business settings, so if you're just like a tourist wanting to know how you can, I know, order food In a restaurant or talk to a clerk at the grocery store, you could get this course. It might help you, but you're not gonna see the best of results, and that's because we created this course just for business professionals. We are business professionals ourselves, and when we move to Korea South Korea we had a really hard time navigating this Contrast between the informal everyday world and the formalities of business. That's why we created this course.

Speaker 2:

Another really good objection that goes almost sounds like you've actually written some emails for selling Korean to people wanted to use it for business.

Speaker 1:

Give me two more months and I'm gonna be able to actually Say a word in Korean.

Speaker 2:

We've got a client who sells courses in Korean. Okay, cool.

Speaker 1:

So you're saying another objection.

Speaker 2:

Sorry that you like or that it comes up.

Speaker 1:

So another objection that's really good for like, it's not for me it's about the cost that comes with implementing what you're teaching.

Speaker 1:

So for entrepreneurs and for businesses. You really need to be sure that the offer you're talking about is Affordable, not just like by this course, but implement the actual teachings. So, for instance, if you're gonna teach people how to hire a whole team and how to manage that team so they can scale their business, where should they be revenue wise? How much money do they need to invest to implement those tactics and what are those specific tactics? Do you teach them how to hire an HR company that you can outtowards the actual hiring process to, and how much would that cost? So you need to be specific. If it's not for beginners Mention, this is not for people who just starting in business. To implement the strategies in this course, you're gonna need to earn at least $50,000 per month because hiring a team, even if it's a minimum three people, it's gonna cost you this amount. So if you're not there right now, that's totally fine. You can continue to learn from us. We would love to be by your side as you grow your business, but this course is not for you.

Speaker 2:

All right, any more objections that you want to cover that people can listen back and write it down to put on the sales page.

Speaker 1:

So a really common one that comes up in all surveys is I don't have time or it's not the right time for me, and obviously in a really good percentage of the time people they just don't have time. That's the reality of things. So if you're selling point is I have 400 hours of content, you're missing out. Nobody wants 400 hours, even 100 hours, 40 hours. That's not like the amount of content you give them. It's not a benefit anymore. It actually gets them to say I don't have time. So what you can do is you break it down into the minimum outcome they can get by implementing the minimum possible out of your course so you can tell them look, I know, you don't have time. Nobody has time nowadays.

Speaker 1:

Everybody is doing 10 different things. You have kids at your door asking for attention, you have bills to pay, you have groceries to buy. You have all these amount of things. I know even finding 30 minutes for learning or for spending time with yourself can be difficult. That's why this course is not designed to consume or to add more stress in your life.

Speaker 1:

We have created easy to digest lessons that, within five to 10 minutes, teach you exactly what you need to do to solve specific problems in your business. So, if you don't know how to post on LinkedIn, we have a four minute tutorial that teaches you all the basic things you need to do to make sure that your blog post is now on LinkedIn and you can then spend the rest of your 30 minutes daily learning area whatever actually implementing what we teach. So you reduce the pressure and you tell them look, you don't have to be the ideal student to be able to have amazing results, but you need to have a minimum outcome, a minimum commitment to get a minimum outcome, and this is what it looks like. Plus, you can also put things into perspective.

Speaker 1:

If your audience is more like procrastinators, you can tell them look, you've been procrastinating the social media aspect of your business for far too long. You can wait one more day, you can even wait one more month, but at the end of the year, when you're going to draw the line, you're not going to be closer to getting more leads coming evergreen from your social media. You're not going to see blah, blah, blah, blah. So you can try, and you can give it a try today. It's risk free. At least you know what you could be getting yourself into and instead of wasting more time. Just wondering is this for me? When will the perfect time be? Or whatever, you will at least know what you could actually do, or some version of that.

Speaker 2:

Nice, all right. So today we've covered what the most common objections are, how to identify your most common objections in your business, the fact that most course graders don't tackle customer objections at all, and instead we should be tackling it straight on in emails, on the sales page and dedicated FAQ emails in a bunch of different places. We want to use social proof, testimony on your case studies, endorsements from celebrities, industry experts, studies in order to make what we're saying more believable, and then we want to have a money back guarantee. And then Monica's taken us through and given us a breakdown of how to actually go about answering a bunch of those different objections. Monica, that was awesome. Thank you so much.

Speaker 2:

As always, super helpful info, and I think people are going to make a lot of money from this by being able to improve their sales pages, their emails. What have you? If you do make a bunch of money, let us know. We always love hearing about it. If you found the interview useful and you want to get future episodes, please subscribe wherever you listened and thanks, as always, for listening in and spending your time with us. And thanks so much, monica, for coming on and sharing your wisdom.

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